Disaster Recovery

Disaster recovery is the process of maintaining stored data after a natural or man-made disaster or emergency threatens the location in which the data is stored or the infrastructure that manages it. Any disaster that threatens data centers or servers can require a recovery process, not just a flood or tornado. A gas leak or a nuclear explosion, for example, also apply, as well as widespread illness. Just a few methods of preparing for disaster recovery include:

Disaster recovery requires a specific team within an organization. Employees at different levels of leadership and responsibility must be aware of disaster recovery plans, and an organization should put a specific plan in place in case a disaster occurs. A disaster recovery plan should include legal compliance plans as well: which customer records does the law require a business to keep, and what security measures need to be placed for certain data?

Disaster-Recovery-as-a-Service (DRaaS) allows businesses to rent servers and infrastructure in case of emergency, providing them with services to continue running applications and storing data. Finding a pay-per-use DRaaS plan is a good option for businesses so they are only charged for the services they use and applications they run. DRaaS providers should also be able to transfer data to a secure cloud environment if physical infrastructure is destroyed.






Jenna Phipps
Jenna Phipps is a contributor for websites such as Webopedia.com and Enterprise Storage Forum. She writes about information technology security, networking, and data storage. Jenna lives in Nashville, TN.

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