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progressive scan

Progressive scan (also known as known as 480p) is one of two methods used for "painting" an image on a television screen (the other being interlaced scan), where the lines are drawn in one at a time in sequential order. The entire single frame image is painted every 1/60th of a second, allowing for twice the detail to be sent in the same amount of time used in interlaced systems. Progressive scan is a method used in today's CRTs, computer monitors and high-end television displays. Progressive scanning results in a more detailed image on the screen and is also less susceptible to the flicker commonly associated with interlaced scanning.

Most television displays that are capable of progressive scanning can also perform deinterlacing, which enables interlaced video to be viewed on progressive scan sets. Progressive scan is now the standard of choice for both DVD video and DTV. To use and view progressive scanning technology the source (DVD player, High-definition cable or satellite for example) and the display must both be progressive scan compatible.

Compare with interlaced scan.







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