Routing

What is Routing?

In networking, routing is the process of moving a packet of data from source to destination. The principles of routing can apply to many networks such as circuit-switched networks and computer networks. Routing is typically performed by a specialized device known as a router.

Routing is a core feature of the internet, where the router selects the paths for Internet Protocol (IP) packets to travel from their origin to the destination. The routing process performed by a router typically directs forwarding on the basis of routing tables, which maintain a record of the routes to various network destinations. A routing table can be compared to a train timetable, where train passengers consult the timetable to decide which train to catch. Routing tables function in the same way, but for network paths rather than trains. These tables may be specified by an administrator, learned by observing network traffic, or built with the assistance of routing protocols.

How routing works

When a router receives a packet, it reads the headers of the packet to see its intended destination. It then determines where to route the packet based on information in its routing table. As a packet travels to its destination, it may be routed multiple times by several routers. Routers perform this process millions of times a second with millions of packets.

Types of routing

There are three main types of routing:

  • Static routing: Routes are manually added into the routing table. With this type of routing, a cheaper router can be used because no routing overhead is required for the router central processing unit (CPU). Static routing adds security and does not require bandwidth usage between routers.
  • Default routing: The router is configured to send all packets toward a single router. This type is typically used with a stub router, which is a router that has only one route to reach all other networks.
  • Dynamic routing: Adjustments of the routes are automatically made according to the current state of the route in the routing table. Dynamic routing uses protocols to discover network destinations and the routes to reach it. It is easy to configure and more effective at selecting the best route to a destination remote network.
Vangie Beal
Vangie Beal
Vangie Beal is a freelance business and technology writer covering Internet technologies and online business since the late '90s.

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