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Characters and ASCII Equivalents

Here are some of the more commonly used characters and their ASCII equivalents.

Pronounced ask-ee, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is a code for representing English characters as numbers, with each letter assigned a number from 0 to 127. For example, the ASCII code for uppercase M is 77. Most computers use ASCII codes to represent text, which makes it possible to transfer data from one computer to another. 

Here are some of the more commonly used characters and their ASCII equivalents. To use a character just copy and paste the ASCII symbol into the formatting of your Web page at the spot where you want the character to show up.

DescriptionCharHEXASCII
space  
20
 
exclamation mark
!
21
!
(double) quotation mark  "
22
"
number sign  #
23
#
dollar sign  $
24
$
percent sign  %
25
%
ampersand  &
26
&
apostrophe
'
27
'
open parenthesis  (
28
(
close parenthesis  )
29
)
asterisk  *
2A
*
plus sign  +
2B
+
comma  ,
2C
,
minus sign/hyphen  -
2D
-
division sign 2
F7
÷
period, decimal point
.
2E
.
slash, virgule, solidus
/
2F
/
digit 0
0
30
0
digit 1
1
31
1
digit 2
2
32
2
digit 3  3
33
3
digit 4
4
34
4
digit 5
5
35
5
digit 6
6
36
6
digit 7
7
37
7
digit 8
8
38
8
digit 9  9
39
9
colon
:
3A
:
semicolon
;
3B
&#059;
less-than sign
<
3C
&#060;
equal sign
=
3D
&#061;
greater-than sign
>
3E
&#062;
question mark
?
3F
&#063;
commercial "at" sign
@
40
&#064;
capital A
A
41
&#065;
capital B
B
42
&#066;
capital C
C
43
&#067;
capital D
D
44
&#068;
capital E
E
45
&#069;
capital F
F
46
&#070;
capital G
G
47
&#071;
capital H
H
48
&#072;
capital I
I
49
&#073;
capital J
J
4A
&#074;
capital K
K
4B
&#075;
capital L
L
4C
&#076;
capital M
M
4D
&#077;
capital N
N
4E
&#078;
capital O
O
4F
&#079;
capital P
P
50
&#080;
capital Q
Q
51
&#081;
capital R
R
52
&#082;
capital S
S
53
&#083;
capital T
T
54
&#084;
capital U  
55
&#085;
capital V
V
56
&#086;
capital W
W
57
&#087;
capital X
X
58
&#088;
capital Y
Y
59
&#089;
capital Z  Z
5A
&#090;
left square bracket
[
5B
&#091;
backslash, reverse solidus
\
5C
&#092;
right square bracket
]
5D
&#093;
spacing circumflex accent
^
5E
&#094;
spacing underscore, low line
_
5F
&#095;
spacing grave accent  `
60
&#096;
small a  a
61
&#097;
small b
b
62
&#098;
small c
c
63
&#099;
small d
d
64
&#100;
small e
e
65
&#101;
small f  f
66
&#102;
small g
g
67
&#103;
small h
h
68
&#104;
small i
i
69
&#105;
small j
j
6A
&#106;
small k
k
6B
&#107;
small l
l
6C
&#108;
small m
m
6D
&#109;
small n
n
6E
&#110;
small o
o
6F
&#111;
small p  p
70
&#112;
small q
q
71
&#113;
small r  r
72
&#114;
small s  s
73
&#115;
small t
t
74
&#116;
small u
u
75
&#117;
small v  v
76
&#118;
small w
w
77
&#119;
small x
x
78
&#120;
small y
y
79
&#121;
small z  z
7A
&#122;
left brace (curly bracket)
{
7B
&#123;
vertical bar
|
7C
&#124;
right brace (curly bracket)  }
7D
&#125;
tilde accent
~
7E
&#126;
delete
^
7F
&#127;
letter modifying circumflex  ˆ
88
&#136;
per thousand (mille) sign
89
&#137;
capital S caron or hacek  
8A
&#138;
left single angle quote mark
8B
&#139;
left single quotation mark
91
&#145;
right single quote mark
92
&#146;
left double quotation mark
93
&#147;
right double quote mark  
94
&#148;
round filled bullet
95
&#149;
en dash
96
&#150;
em dash
97
&#151;
small spacing tilde accent
˜
98
&#152;
trademark sign  
99
&#153;
inverted exclamation mark
¡
A1
&#161;
cent sign
¢
A2
&#162;
pound sterling sign
£
A3
&#163;
yen sign
¥
A5
&#165;
broken vertical bar  
A6
&#166;
section sign
§
A7
&#167;
copyright sign
©
A9
&#169;
logical not sign
¬
AC
&#172;
soft hyphen  
AD
&#173;
registered trademark sign
®
AE
&#174;
degree sign
°
B0
&#176;
plus-or-minus sign  
B1
&#177;
micro sign
µ
B5
&#181;
paragraph sign, pilcrow sign
B6
&#182;
inverted question mark
¿
BF
&#191;
capital A grave
À
C0
&#192;
capital A acute
Á
C1
&#193;
capital A circumflex
Â
C2
&#194;
capital A tilde
Ã
C3
&#195;
capital A dieresis or umlaut
Ä
C4
&#196;
capital A ring
Å
C5
&#197;
capital AE ligature
Æ
C6
&#198;
capital C cedilla
Ç
C7
&#199;
capital E grave
È
C8
&#200;
capital E acute
É
C9
&#201;
capital E circumflex
Ê
CA
&#202;
capital E dieresis or umlaut  
CB
&#203;
capital I grave
Ì
CC
&#204;
capital I acute
Í
CD
&#205;
capital I circumflex
Î
CE
&#206;
capital I dieresis or umlaut
Ï
CF
&#207;
capital N tilde
Ñ
D1
&#209;
small sharp s, sz ligature  
DF
&#223;
small a grave
à
E0
&#224;
small a acute
á
E1
&#225;
small a circumflex
â
E2
&#226;
small a tilde
ã
E3
&#227;
small a dieresis or umlaut
ä
E4
&#228;
small a ring
å
E5
&#229;
small ae ligature
æ
E6
&#230;
small c cedilla
ç
E7
&#231;
small e grave
è
E8
&#232;
small e acute
é
E9
&#233;
small e circumflex
ê
EA
&#234;
small e dieresis or umlaut
ë
EB
&#235;
small n tilde
ñ
F1
&#241;


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