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Retina Display

Retina Display is a marketing term developed by Apple to refer to devices and monitors that have a resolution and pixel density so high – roughly 300 or more pixels per inch – that a person is unable to discern the individual pixels at a normal viewing distance. Apple's Retina Display made its debut on 2011's iPhone 4S, which featured a 960x640 pixel screen with four times the number of pixels (326 pixels per inch) as the iPhone 4.

The new iPad that was released in early 2012 included a 2048x1536 resolution Retina Display as well. The 2012 lines of updated Mac Book Pro and Mac Book Air notebooks are expected to include Retina Display screens with 2880x1800 resolution displays. Intel is also expected to help make Retina Display a reality in laptops and Windows 8 tablets and ultrabooks with its new Ivy Bridge processor architecture.







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